Mariyuki



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by Bettina Andrianantoandro

by Bettina Andrianantoandro




The Tallest Man on Earth, live concert at Lido, Berlin (06.07.2012).
Photo by Kai Müller.

The Tallest Man on Earth, live concert at Lido, Berlin (06.07.2012).

Photo by Kai Müller.

05:32 pm, by mariyuki67 notes Comments



© Gillian Wearing. Trauma #4 (2003) 

© Gillian Wearing. Trauma #4 (2003) 

04:54 pm, by mariyuki20 notes Comments




Tim Flach

Tim Flach

07:35 pm, by mariyuki1 note Comments

Where does a thought go when it’s forgotten?
Photo by Gosia Janik.

via pulpinsidefiction

Where does a thought go when it’s forgotten?

Photo by Gosia Janik.

via pulpinsidefiction


The Objectuals (2007) - Hyung koo Lee

The Objectuals (2007) - Hyung koo Lee

10:26 am, by mariyuki4 notes Comments


Curtains (1972) by Fred Herzog.
“Herzog estimates he has taken about 100,000 colour photographs (there are 30,000 black-and-white images too). They represent a priceless record of a city whose subsequent growth has to a great extent wiped out the place he first encountered. They were also artistically pioneering; he was shooting in colour at a time when serious art photography was all about black-and-white.
It would not be unfair to call Herzog’s images beautiful, yet they capture the less-than-pretty aspects of his adopted city. He chose to document the disenfranchised world of what is now Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside rather than the ocean and the mountains; the squalor rather than the cherry blossoms; the working-class reality rather than the tourist-brochure fantasy. His photos are often populated with the downtrodden, the marginalized, the forgotten, and members of minority communities that were more invisible than visible at the time.” - Marsha Lederman
via terresauvage.

Curtains (1972) by Fred Herzog.

“Herzog estimates he has taken about 100,000 colour photographs (there are 30,000 black-and-white images too). They represent a priceless record of a city whose subsequent growth has to a great extent wiped out the place he first encountered. They were also artistically pioneering; he was shooting in colour at a time when serious art photography was all about black-and-white.

It would not be unfair to call Herzog’s images beautiful, yet they capture the less-than-pretty aspects of his adopted city. He chose to document the disenfranchised world of what is now Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside rather than the ocean and the mountains; the squalor rather than the cherry blossoms; the working-class reality rather than the tourist-brochure fantasy. His photos are often populated with the downtrodden, the marginalized, the forgotten, and members of minority communities that were more invisible than visible at the time.” - Marsha Lederman

via terresauvage.

01:53 pm, reblogged from HC by mariyuki612 notes Comments



Albanians sleep in the open air early in the morning at the border point of Qafa E Prushit by Joachim Ladefoged

via silfarione

Albanians sleep in the open air early in the morning at the border point of Qafa E Prushit by Joachim Ladefoged

via silfarione


 Guinevere Van Seenus by Daniel Jackson

via irere,felixinclusis.

 Guinevere Van Seenus by Daniel Jackson

via irere,felixinclusis.


04:41 pm, by mariyuki58 notes Comments



Vacuum-sealed couples by photographer Hal.

Vacuum-sealed couples by photographer Hal.

09:18 am, by mariyuki4 notes Comments



The autochrome, the earliest color (1907-1932)

"The autochrome  process was invented during the years 1895-1903, by the French brothers  Louis Lumière (1864-1947 and Auguste Lumière (1862-1954). It took them  four further years to work out and refine the several fabrication  processes. Finally in 1907 the autochrome plates came on the market and  were an instant success. Until now, the photographers’ only way to  produce color was tinting the plates by hand which was done by many  photographers with breathtaking artistry." via accidental mysteries

The autochrome, the earliest color (1907-1932)

"The autochrome process was invented during the years 1895-1903, by the French brothers Louis Lumière (1864-1947 and Auguste Lumière (1862-1954). It took them four further years to work out and refine the several fabrication processes. Finally in 1907 the autochrome plates came on the market and were an instant success. Until now, the photographers’ only way to produce color was tinting the plates by hand which was done by many photographers with breathtaking artistry." via accidental mysteries

08:24 pm, by mariyuki5 notes Comments