Mariyuki



Untitled


free counters

Theme by spaceperson Powered by Tumblr

klammer
Tagged
Science


Digitally-colorized scanning electron micrograph of Borella burgdorferi bacteria.

via Public Health Image Library, scipsy.




Fastest X-ray images of tiny biological crystals
"An international research team headed by DESY scientists from the Center  for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg, Germany, has  recorded the shortest X-ray exposure of a protein crystal ever achieved.  The incredible brief exposure time of 0.000 000 000 000 03 seconds (30  femtoseconds) opens up new possibilities for imaging molecular processes  with X-rays.
The molecular structure of proteins is inferred by X-ray diffraction  from crystals composed of building blocks of identical protein  molecules.  This image shows the amount of atomic disordering that  occurs in such a protein crystal when illuminated by an ultra-intense  pulse from an X-ray free-electron laser. The disordering increases with  time (depicted by colour changing from blue to red). The crystal becomes  an amorphous soup of atoms by the end of the pulse, which no longer  gives strong diffraction peaks. The diffraction peaks at high resolution  turn off early in the pulse, whereas low-resolution diffraction lasts  longer. Even if pulses are much longer than the explosion timescale, the  measurement corresponds to the undamaged molecule.
Credit: Carl Caleman  and Anton Barty, CFEL/DESY”

via desy

I´d love to try this with my proteins!
:-O

Fastest X-ray images of tiny biological crystals

"An international research team headed by DESY scientists from the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg, Germany, has recorded the shortest X-ray exposure of a protein crystal ever achieved. The incredible brief exposure time of 0.000 000 000 000 03 seconds (30 femtoseconds) opens up new possibilities for imaging molecular processes with X-rays.

The molecular structure of proteins is inferred by X-ray diffraction from crystals composed of building blocks of identical protein molecules. This image shows the amount of atomic disordering that occurs in such a protein crystal when illuminated by an ultra-intense pulse from an X-ray free-electron laser. The disordering increases with time (depicted by colour changing from blue to red). The crystal becomes an amorphous soup of atoms by the end of the pulse, which no longer gives strong diffraction peaks. The diffraction peaks at high resolution turn off early in the pulse, whereas low-resolution diffraction lasts longer. Even if pulses are much longer than the explosion timescale, the measurement corresponds to the undamaged molecule.

Credit: Carl Caleman and Anton Barty, CFEL/DESY”

via desy

I´d love to try this with my proteins!

:-O

01:29 pm, by mariyuki23 notes Comments



Tantalising hints of the Higgs boson © 2011 CERN
"The Higgs boson, a.k.a. “the God Particle”, is a subatomic particle, whose existence is a key to explaining why there is mass in the universe.” (more)
“Real CMS proton-proton collision events in which 4 high energy electrons (green lines and red towers) are observed. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of a Higgs boson but is also consistent with  background Standard Model physics processes.” via CERN
video: The Higgs mechanism

Tantalising hints of the Higgs boson © 2011 CERN

"The Higgs boson, a.k.a. “the God Particle”, is a subatomic particle, whose existence is a key to explaining why there is mass in the universe.” (more)

Real CMS proton-proton collision events in which 4 high energy electrons (green lines and red towers) are observed. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of a Higgs boson but is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes.” via CERN

video: The Higgs mechanism

05:30 pm, by mariyuki16 notes Comments



“One of the first drawings of a neuron” by Ramón y Cajal (Via)
writersnoonereads:

No one reads Dr. Bacteria, pseudonym of Spanish neurobiologist and Nobel Prize winner Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934).
From an article by Laura Otis, translator of Cajal’s Vacation Stories:

Few scientists who admire neurobiologist Santiago Ramón y Cajal’s extraordinary drawings of neurons know that early in his career, he wrote science fiction. Cajal’s Vacation Stories, written in 1885–86 and published in 1905, explore the ethical consequences of what was then cutting-edge science: bacteriology, artificial insemination, photography, and the power of suggestion. Those who have read Cajal’s Recollections of My Life and Advice for a Young Investigator know how vividly he recreates the lab atmosphere for readers, but his short stories have a creative vision and wicked humor that even these classics lack. In his first years as a scientist, Cajal used fiction to take a “vacation” from the rules of scientific writing so that he could consider the future of science. [cont. reading]

“One of the first drawings of a neuron” by Ramón y Cajal (Via)

writersnoonereads:

No one reads Dr. Bacteria, pseudonym of Spanish neurobiologist and Nobel Prize winner Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934).

From an article by Laura Otis, translator of Cajal’s Vacation Stories:

Few scientists who admire neurobiologist Santiago Ramón y Cajal’s extraordinary drawings of neurons know that early in his career, he wrote science fiction. Cajal’s Vacation Stories, written in 1885–86 and published in 1905, explore the ethical consequences of what was then cutting-edge science: bacteriology, artificial insemination, photography, and the power of suggestion. Those who have read Cajal’s Recollections of My Life and Advice for a Young Investigator know how vividly he recreates the lab atmosphere for readers, but his short stories have a creative vision and wicked humor that even these classics lack. In his first years as a scientist, Cajal used fiction to take a “vacation” from the rules of scientific writing so that he could consider the future of science. [cont. reading]


sexual chromosomes visualized by electron microscopy

sexual chromosomes visualized by electron microscopy


08:22 pm, by mariyuki56 notes Comments

The wondering scientist by Soundfrequency

A very interesting mixtape for scientists

06:30 pm, by mariyuki Comments

Der Mensch als Industriepalast [Man as Industrial Palace]

by Henning Lederer

"The intertwining of science, art and technology: An animated and interactive installation based on the poster of the same title by Fritz Kahn from 1927."

05:43 pm, by mariyuki4 notes Comments



Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins by Meredith Frampton, 1938
via kraftgenie on Flickr.
"Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins  (20 June 1861 – 16 May 1947) was an English biochemist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1929, with Christiaan Eijkman, for the discovery of vitamins. He also discovered the amino acid tryptophan, in 1901. He was appointed President of the Royal Society from 1930 to 1935.”(via Wikipedia)

Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins by Meredith Frampton, 1938

via kraftgenie on Flickr.

"Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins  (20 June 1861 – 16 May 1947) was an English biochemist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1929, with Christiaan Eijkman, for the discovery of vitamins. He also discovered the amino acid tryptophan, in 1901. He was appointed President of the Royal Society from 1930 to 1935.”(via Wikipedia)

12:36 pm, by mariyuki43 notes Comments



SLICES OF LIFE
"On a vine-covered wall, MRI brain scans of happy minds and sad minds mingle. Artist Mireia Guitart collaborated with neuroscientist Simon  Surguladze of King’s College London to create the work, and she said it  is meant to show how similar areas of the brain are activated in  response to each emotion.”

SLICES OF LIFE

"On a vine-covered wall, MRI brain scans of happy minds and sad minds mingle. Artist Mireia Guitart collaborated with neuroscientist Simon Surguladze of King’s College London to create the work, and she said it is meant to show how similar areas of the brain are activated in response to each emotion.”

09:28 am, by mariyuki5 notes Comments


05:18 pm, by mariyuki6 notes Comments

T4 bacteriophage injecting DNA into a cell
My favourite virus ever

T4 bacteriophage injecting DNA into a cell


My favourite virus ever

05:07 pm, by mariyuki16 notes Comments